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Digital Cameras

Updated: 24-03-2017 05:17

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#1
alaScore 100

Fujifilm X-T2

With a brilliant new AF system, lovely handling and an updated sensor that delivers pin-sharp...

50 expert reviews | 12 user reviews

performance  
image quality  
screen  
usability  
#2
alaScore 99

Nikon D500

The Nikon D500 is a DSLR with little compare. It steps up beyond the Canon EOS 7D Mark II...

57 expert reviews | 89 user reviews

performance  
usability  
screen  
image quality  
#3
alaScore 99

Sony Alpha A6300

The A6300 is a well-rounded camera with a good specification, and delivers great performance in a...

52 expert reviews | 179 user reviews

performance  
usability  
size  
portability  
#4
alaScore 98

Fujifilm X-Pro2

The X-Pro2's tweaks and tinkers forge a far more accomplished camera than the original X-Pro1 for...

54 expert reviews | 84 user reviews

performance  
usability  
image quality  
design  
#5
alaScore 98

Panasonic Lumix DMC-G80 / G81 / G85

The Lumix G80 might not be the most visually exciting camera in the world. Its DSLR looks are...

22 expert reviews | 2 user reviews

image quality  
screen  
performance  
design  
#6
alaScore 98

Canon EOS 80D

Canon has created an excellent camera for enthusiast photographers that makes a worthwhile...

50 expert reviews | 187 user reviews

performance  
usability  
screen  
portability  
#7
alaScore 98

Nikon D3400

The Nikon D3400 has plenty going for it, with a beautifully compact body, a decent AF system...

34 expert reviews | 12 user reviews

portability  
screen  
image quality  
usability  
#8
alaScore 97

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

It's been four years since the 5D Mk III hit the market, so has the Mark IV version been worth...

36 expert reviews | 25 user reviews

performance  
usability  
image quality  
screen  
#9
alaScore 97

Nikon D5

The Nikon D5 will keep pros happy with its great burst-shooting and low-light performance, but a...

51 expert reviews | 27 user reviews

performance  
durability  
portability  
usability  
#10
alaScore 97

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 III

The RX10 III's 24-600mm Zeiss lens, coupled with Sony's excellent 1-inch sensor, deliver class...

20 expert reviews | 30 user reviews

performance  
image quality  
usability  
portability  
#11
alaScore 97

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ2500 (Lumix DMC-FZ2000)

The Panasonic FZ2000 is a bridge camera, but perhaps not in a form you'd expect. It's designed to...

15 expert reviews | 6 user reviews

performance  
zoom  
price  
portability  
#12
alaScore 97

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II

Mirrorless cameras promise DSLR quality, features and controls in a smaller package, and the OM-D...

50 expert reviews | 234 user reviews

usability  
performance  
portability  
size  
#13
alaScore 97

Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II

Canon didn't need to deliver a major overhaul of its excellent G7 X, and the upgrades in the G7 X...

37 expert reviews | 117 user reviews

performance  
usability  
portability  
image quality  
#14
alaScore 97

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX80

Although the price may seem a little on the high side compared with competing cameras like the X...

34 expert reviews | 90 user reviews

performance  
usability  
size  
image quality  
#15
alaScore 97

Fujifilm X70

The X70 offers traditional exposure controls and an APS-C format sensor in compact form, and it...

39 expert reviews | 74 user reviews

performance  
screen  
usability  
image quality  
#16
alaScore 96

Canon EOS 5Ds / 5Ds R

The Canon EOS 5DS is a specialist DSLR, that's for sure, but treated with knowledge and it's a...

64 expert reviews | 148 user reviews

image quality  
performance  
usability  
durability  
#17
alaScore 96

Sony Alpha 7R II / A7R II

While its huge pixel count makes the A7R II a serious DSLR alternative for landscape and portrait...

56 expert reviews | 373 user reviews

performance  
usability  
image quality  
portability  
#18
alaScore 96

Fujifilm X-T10

As we quipped within the opening lines of this review, the X-T10's Terminator-like name actually...

51 expert reviews | 242 user reviews

performance  
usability  
portability  
size  
#19
alaScore 96

Pentax K-1

The Pentax K-1 is one of the more interesting DLSR cameras we've seen in recent years. One...

26 expert reviews | 12 user reviews

image quality  
performance  
durability  
screen  
#20
alaScore 96

Canon EOS 750D / Rebel T6i / KISS X8i

This is a great camera that's capable of delivering superb image quality. The polished control...

47 expert reviews | 1248 user reviews

usability  
performance  
price  
image quality  
#21
alaScore 96

Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 / DMC-G70

Replacing the Panasonic G6, the G7 sits beneath the Panasonic GH4 in the company's line-up of...

70 expert reviews | 463 user reviews

usability  
performance  
price  
portability  
#22
alaScore 96

Nikon D5500

Nikon has two DSLR series aimed at beginners. The cheaper D3000-series cameras like the D3300 are...

82 expert reviews | 1106 user reviews

usability  
portability  
performance  
price  
#23
alaScore 96

Nikon D7200

The Nikon D7200 is one of the best enthusiast DSLRs out there, and a great choice if you're...

78 expert reviews | 788 user reviews

performance  
usability  
image quality  
price  
#24
alaScore 96

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV

There's no escaping it - the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 IV is one pricey compact camera. Is that the...

52 expert reviews | 620 user reviews

performance  
usability  
portability  
image quality  
#25
alaScore 96

Sony Alpha a6500

In-body image stabilization finally comes to the Sony APS-C flagship. Add bucketloads of buffer...

20 expert reviews | 2 user reviews

performance  
screen  
usability  
price  

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    Buying Guide

    Buying Guide - Digital Cameras

    Hunting for a digital compact camera? Be prepared to enter a confusing world of megapixels, lens types, shutter lags, shutter speeds, and other technical specs that’ll make your head spin. Buying a digital camera can be a challenge, especially if you aren’t quite sure of what you’re looking for. That’s why we made this digital compact camera buying guide to shepherd you through the chaotic and confusing world of cameras.

    Forget the Megapixels

    A few years ago, you couldn’t walk through an electronics store without half a dozen camera manufacturers aggressively advertising the megapixel count of their digital cameras. These ‘megapixel wars’ are a thing of the past now, and it’s nearly impossible to stumble upon a digital camera that does not boast of more than 10 megapixels. For the consumers, this is a good thing. It means you can safely buy any camera and at least be assured that the megapixel count will be up to par. But of course, without the safety of megapixels to fall back on, you’ll also have to do a lot more research before you make a purchase decision.

    Size Matters

    Since this guide is focused largely on compact digital cameras, let us leave the DSLRs out of the equation. In the compact camera game, size matters, but smaller does not always equal better. Smaller cameras often compromise on features and battery life to accommodate all that hardware in that small form factor. When it comes to a choice, always pick features and price over size.

    LCD Screen

    Digital camera LCD screens had immense ‘wow’ factor a few years ago, but are a standard feature on every camera these days. A 2.5” screen is the norm and works perfectly for most purposes. Larger screens offer more real estate for framing and browsing through pictures. A lot of compact digital cameras also have touchscreens these days which can make the camera easier to operate, though this usually comes at a price.

    Zooming In

    The zoom is an essential feature of every digital camera and usually comes in two flavors – optical zoom and digital zoom. Optical zoom is the preferred variant since it involves moving the lens forward, which results in better picture quality. Digital zoom is usually found on cheaper cameras and works by cropping and resizing the image digitally. The end result is the same as optical zoom, though the image quality suffers. When in doubt, pick a camera with optical zoom over one with digital zoom.

    Battery Life

    Most buyers tend to overlook battery life, which usually results in the camera dying out in the middle of a vacation or an extended photography session. This is perhaps one of the most important features of any digital camera and careful attention must be paid to it before you plop down your money. Needless to say, the longer the battery life, the better.

    Battery Type

    Inherently tied to battery life is the battery type. A camera can either use a rechargeable lithium battery, or alkaline batteries. Lithium ion batteries require external power to charge up, while alkaline batteries can be easily removed and a new pair popped in place. Consequently, alkaline batteries are more appropriate for long photography sessions since you can easily carry a spare set. Rechargeable batteries on the other hand, tend to be more economical in the long run.

    HDTV Compatibility

    You should be able to hook up the camera directly to your HDTV to show off your photography skills. High resolution pictures on the HDTV makes for a stunning experience.

    Shutter Lag

    Shutter lag can be defined as the time required to take a picture – i.e. the lag between pressing the shutter button, and the camera actually taking the picture. A lower shutter lag value allows you to take pictures more spontaneously. If you want to catch a friend performing an impromptu dance move at a beach vacation, or catch your son hitting a ball straight into the goal post, you should look for a camera with low shutter lag values.

    Full High Definition 1080p

    Full high definition pictures at 1920x1080 resolution is the holy grail of compact digital cameras, promising images that will pop out and capture all the details in any landscape. If your budget allows it, always pick a camera that offers 1080p resolution.

    Video Capabilities

    Cameras are used for far more than taking merely photographs these days. Your camera should allow for at least 15-20 minutes of video recording, preferably in high definition at 720p resolution.

    Software Features

    How easy is it to operate the camera’s software? Does the software offer any options for editing the photo on the fly, or adding interesting effects such as motion blur, sepia filters, etc.? Ask these questions before you set down your money for a purchase.

    Other Features

    Facial recognition, image stabilization, scene recognition, noise reduction – this list can go on and on and be quite disorienting for the lay buyer. Focus on the above features, and once the camera passes all these basic tests, start comparing things like facial recognition, etc. These are nice additions to a digital camera, but you should never base your buying decision on them.

    Durability

    Last, but not the least, you’ll most likely use the camera outdoors in trying conditions. Features like weatherproofing, and durability become important in this regard. For instance, some camera LCD screens are made from Gorilla Glass these days. Ruggedness is always a welcome feature in any camera.

     

    Buying a digital compact camera isn’t an easy task, given the number of variables one has to consider. Hopefully, this guide will help you tread in the right direction.

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    Digital Cameras on alaTest

    alaTest.co.uk has collected and analyzed millions of reviews from 3031 sources to help you choose the best Digital Camera from top brands like Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, Samsung and more.

    Buying Tips Read our Buying Guide
    before you make your purchase